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Vitamin C – The Facts

Apr 24, 2020 | Health, Nutrition, Supplements

There has never been so much talk about Vitamin C as there is now. There are news reports that hospitals in both China and New York are administering Vitamin C to patients intravenously.

Linus Pauling, a chemist and peace activist who won two Nobel Prize awards, developed a system in the early 1950s for preventing and treating heart attacks combining vitamin C, the amino acids lysine and proline, and plant antioxidants – similar to the supplementation programmes I tend to recommend today. 

So how much do we really need?

Human beings, unlike most animals, are unable to make any new Vitamin C. While Vitamin C is stored in cells and tissues, particularly white blood cells, eyes, adrenal glands, pituitary gland, and brain, it needs constant replenishment. So it is an essential part of our daily diet.

The RDA has risen from 30mg to 110mg for men and 80 mg for women (EU, 2013). People today consume about 80mg of vitamin C from food, and on average, a further 1000mg (one gram) or so from supplements.

I have been taking 2 grams a day for as long as I can remember but have increased it to 4-5 grams since the start of the Coronavirus.

Colds and stress

Vitamin C supports the immune system – particularly the white blood cells, that play a key role in controlling inflammation. Stressful conditions quickly deplete Vitamin C in these cells – this also happens in the early stages of a cold or infection.

Several recent studies indicate that 1 gram per day for an adult of vitamin C supplementation prevents this depletion. This may not be a cure for a cold but research shows is likely to help prevent complications such as pneumonia and respiratory infections.

Radiate – from the inside out

Because vitamin C plays a critical role in collagen formation, it can be especially beneficial to the skin, plus its antioxidant powers also come into play – loss of collagen is a major reason for wrinkle formation.

But much more than the beauty aspect, proper collagen formation is essential for the health of the blood vessels – both small and large. When small blood vessels are weak, it may show up as easy bruising or thread veins, while for larger arteries, any roughness or irregularity may set off clot or plaque formation, the root cause of heart attacks and strokes.

Food sources of Vitamin C

Fruits and leafy vegetables, potatoes, citrus juices, peppers, broccoli, Brussel sprouts, liver, kidney and fresh milk are all sources of vitamin C.

But a problem arises when you buy an apple that has been in storage for two years!

Heating, delay after cooking, processing and storage all deplete Vitamin C available to us, even if our diets are correct all the time. Alcohol seems to reduce vitamin C absorption considerably too. So there is a good case for supplementation.

My Vitamin C Recommendations

I take a Vitamin C Powder known as Sodium Ascorbate is a non-acidic form of Vitamin C that won’t give you an acid/alkaline imbalance:

Check out Non-Acid Vitamin C

Take 1-2g a day. ¼ teaspoon = 1g

I also take this as it is particularly helpful for us ladies. As a fat-soluble form of Vitamin C it delivers powerful antioxidants, with a sensational effect of skin rejuvenation. I see it as an internal spa treatment as it can almost preserve our cells so you radiate from the inside out:

Radiance C is here

Take 3 – 6 capsules a day. 3 capsules = 1g

 

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